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Heart & Blood vessel disorders

In a clinical trial on athletes at the University of Pretoria 35 drops of Cellfood® increased the oxygen uptake by 5%, and normalized all haematological (blood) values, amongst others.

Our products, in addition to and in conjunction with other medical treatments, can be of great benefit to one's health.

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Cardiovascular disease

According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Southern Africa about 130 heart attacks and 240 strokes occur daily. Smoking doubles the risk of having a stroke and increases the risk of a heart attack by two to three times. Cardiovascular disease (CVD - disease of the heart and blood vessels) claims more lives than the subsequent six causes of death combined.

CVD is seen as having multiple causes, including:

  • Nutritional deficiencies and/or excess of anti-nutrients (sugar, processed foods, saturated fat, etc.)
  • Excess production of free radicals
  • Excess stress resulting in an overproduction of the stress hormones (adrenalin, noradrenalin, cortisol)
  • The release of inflammatory cells (cytokines) in response to aIl of the above

Risk factors for CVD include factors that can not be changed (i.e. age, genetics and gender) and those that can be changed/controlled by lifestyle.

  • Chronic degenerative diseases like obesity, stroke, heart disease, diabetes and some cancers are also considered by experts as risk factors for CVD.

Factors that can be changed/controlled by lifestyle

The success of lifestyle management programmes is definitely more successful when initiated before the onset of the disease.

1.         Diet

One of the most successful lifestyle modifications for the prevention/management of CVD is dietary modification.

  • People are advised to eat small meals more regularly and reduce animal protein intake.
  • Dieticians suggest people remove, or at least reduce saturated/hydrogenated fats from the diet, and avoid excess sugar and caffeine intake.
  • They further encourage people to increase the consumption of plant protein (nuts, seeds, legumes, and beans), vegetables, fruit, and whole grains, avoiding processed and fast foods as far as possible.

Taking nutritional supplements could also be of benefit. Nutrients that could be helpful for heart disease include:

  • Co-enzyme Q10 - one of the most important nutrients for heart muscle functions; increases oxygenation of heart tissue. Has been shown to prevent recurrences in individuals who had a heart attack
  • L-carnitine - essential nutrient allowing the mitochondria of the heart cells to produce energy more effectively. Reduces fat and triglyceride levels in the blood
  • Magnesium - relaxes smooth muscle (is a vasodilator) and decreases the risk of irregular heart beat
  • Potassium – needed for electrolyte balance, especially if taking cortisone or blood pressure medication
  • Copper - deficiency has been linked with heart disease
  • Selenium - deficiency has been linked with heart disease
  • Vitamin E - a good antioxidant that also decreases platelet adhesiveness and aggregation
  • Vitamin C - an antioxidant which is important for the integrity of the cardiovascular system
  • Omega 3/fish oils - useful in the prevention of coronary heart disease (helps prevent the hardening of the arteries)
  • Flavonoids - decrease capillary fragility, improve the tone of vascular smooth muscles, decrease the incidence of ventricular tachycardia, and have an antioxidant effect on the heart
  • The amino acid L -arginine - a precursor in the production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator in the vascular system. It also has a protective effect on endothelium
  • Vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid - inversely associated with levels of homocysteine, which is an important risk factor for heart disease
  • Citrin K (an extract from Garcinia cambogia) - inhibits the synthesis of fatty acids in the liver, thus helping to prevent the accumulation of potentially dangerous fats 

2.         Smoking

Tobacco smoke contains thousands of chemical constituents, amongst others, nicotine and carbon monoxide.

  • At doses normally ingested by smokers, nicotine acts as a stimulant on the central nervous system – adrenaline production increases, raising the blood pressure and heart rate
  • Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin, interfering with the transport of oxygen throughout the body
  • It also promotes the development of cholesterol deposits on artery walls
  • These two factors increase the risk of heart attack and stroke

3.         Exercise

Research indicates that 30 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise (jogging, cycling, walking or swimming) three to four times a week is sufficient to assist the cardiovascular system and to help manage weight.

  • To optimise the health benefits of an exercise regime, training should however be maintained indefinitely
  • Free radicals increase in the body during stress and exercise. They cause oxidative stress to the body and may contribute to more than sixty health conditions, including atherosclerosis and heart disease
  • Fortunately the body has antioxidant enzymes, and the diet and supplements containing antioxidants assist the body in supporting the immune and cardiovascular systems, amongst others

4.         Weight management

Overweight and obesity are associated with a number of disabling and potentially fatal conditions and diseases (such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes).

  • A healthy body weight is an important part of wellness - but short-term dieting is not part of a fit and well lifestyle
  • Maintaining a healthy body weight requires a lifelong commitment to regular exercise, a healthy diet, and effective stress management

5.         Rest and relaxation

People in general need between seven and eight hours of uninterrupted sleep a night. A stress management programme can assist those not getting sufficient rest.

Cellfood® Sport/Shape

In a clinical trial on athletes at the University of Pretoria 20 drops of Cellfood® Sport/Shape:

  • Increased the oxygen uptake by up to 6.2%
  • Increased energy delivery to muscles (haemoglobin oxygen saturation increased up to 9.6%)
  • Delayed onset of fatigue and reduced muscular cramps and recovery time (Lactic acid accumulation decreased up to 17.2%)

Cellfood® Sport/Shape contains Cellfood®, Citrin K and L-carnitine

  • Citrin K - inhibits the synthesis of fatty acids in the liver, thus helping to prevent the accumulation of potentially dangerous fats
  • L-carnitine - essential nutrient allowing the mitochondria of the heart cells to produce energy more effectively. Reduces fat and triglyceride levels in the blood

Cellfood® Longevity

  • Vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid - inversely associated with levels of homocysteine, which is an important risk factor for heart disease

Conclusion

The world of the new millennium is the world of the individual - people expect to get more out of life and improve their quality of life.

  • Most conditions being treated by medicines are preventable - chronic degenerative diseases like heart disease and stroke, are clearly linked to the diet and lifestyle.
  • People with cardiovascular disease could benefit from using Cellfood® and the Cellfood® family

Stroke

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when blood is unable to circulate through the brain. When brain cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, they begin to die. Stroke is a serious, life-threatening situation that must be treated promptly to avoid permanent disability.

  • Stroke is a major killer, the third biggest in the western world
  • Stroke is a major cause of adult disability; until the age of 74, males are 1.25 -1.5 times more likely to have a stroke than females. After this age the incidence rates equalise
  • Women have increased lifetime stroke risk and more disabling strokes compared to men.

Stroke is a serious condition for which medical advice should immediately be sought. Irrespective of what medical treatment is instituted, there is much that the patient can do nutritionally to assist in recovery and prevent recurrence.

Overview of the pathophysiology

During a stroke, the lack of blood flow to the brain causes primary neuronal cell death. This causes neurological impairments that are dependent on the size and location of the lesion, as well as the speed with which the lesion occurs.

  • The majority (87%) of strokes are ischemic - because of a thrombosis (thrombotic stroke - clot forms inside a blocked vessel in the brain) or embolism (embolic stroke - clot forms elsewhere in the body and travels to the brain until it gets lodged in a narrow artery)
  • In the region of 10% are caused by a haemorrhage of a blood vessel in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke). A haemorrhagic stroke occurs when a vessel in the brain ruptures and causes leakage of blood into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid
  • Atherosclerosis is the most common underlying cause of ischemic stroke
  • During an ischemic stroke, the ischemic cascade occurs as diminished blood flow to the brain starts a series of biochemical reactions that can result in additional delayed damage to brain cells
  • If medical intervention is received quickly after the first warning signs of a stroke, the chances for the occurrence of the ischemic cascade process are lowered, and the risk for irreversible complications is reduced.

Risk factors

The classical risk factors are high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and other atherosclerotic risk factors, such as homocysteine - especially in the case of male stroke victims. Predisposing risk factors for ischemic stroke include hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus.

This highlights the prominent role lifestyle plays in the origin of stroke.

  • Non-modifiable risk factors include age, race, gender, and family history
  • Modifiable risk factors for a stroke that are well documented include previous transient ischemic attack, atrial fibrillation, carotid artery disease, CAD (coronary artery disease), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, obesity and Sickle cell disease.

One of the strongest predictors of a stroke is transient ischemic attacks (TIA). This is often called “mini” strokes.

  • TIA’s are brief episodes of neurological dysfunction resulting from focal cerebral ischemia and it is not associated with permanent cerebral infarction
  • TIA’s offers an opportunity to initiate treatment that can delay or prevent the onset of permanently disabling injury.

Prevention and treatment

The critical factor in successful treatment of stroke is reaching medical assistance rapidly; the faster the diagnosis and treatment commences, the better the chance for a full recovery.

  • In the case of ischaemic strokes, the blockage must be removed from the blood vessel involved
  • A clot-dissolving drug can quickly dissolve the blockage and allow the circulation to be restored, but it must be used within three hours of the beginning of stroke symptoms, and there are risks to this therapy
  • In some cases of ischaemic stroke, surgery to remove the blockages in an artery is a better treatment than clot-dissolving medication. In strokes caused by bleeding blood vessels, surgery may be used to treat bleeding or prevent future bleeding.

In addition to aspirin, the classical medical approach is based on anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs (like aspirin,) antihypertensives, diuretics and, in emergencies, surgery. All of these drugs have side effects, some of which are serious. This is a matter of concern, since they have to be used over lengthy periods of time. While these drugs may be useful in the short term, it is not wise to rely on them for the long-term management and prevention of the disease.

Modification of multiple risk factors through a combination of comprehensive lifestyle interventions and appropriate pharmacological therapy is seen as the cornerstone of initiatives aimed at the prevention of recurrent stroke and acute cardiac events in stroke survivors.

  • Strokes can be prevented by reducing a person's risk with healthy lifestyle changes and by seeking treatment after TIAs
  • Lifestyle changes include cessation of cigarette smoking, lowering cholesterol and homocysteine levels and maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise
  • Once a patient has suffered a stroke, anti-platelet medications that cut down on blood clotting can be used to prevent future clots
  • Some stroke patients with cardiac disease will require treatment with blood thinners to reduce their risk of future strokes.

Food and nutritional supplements containing garlic, onion, calcium, evening primrose oil, lecithin, kelp, Gingko biloba, bioflavonoids, antioxidants such as vitamin E and C (to strengthen artery walls and reduce cadmium levels) and omega-3 acids can be of assistance in thinning the blood (reduce blood clotting).

Cellfood® Sport/Shape contains Cellfood®, Citrin K and L-carnitine

  • Citrin K - inhibits the synthesis of fatty acids in the liver, thus helping to prevent the accumulation of potentially dangerous fats
  • L-carnitine - essential nutrient allowing the mitochondria of the heart cells to produce energy more effectively. Reduces fat and triglyceride levels in the blood.

Cellfood® Longevity

  • Vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid as contained in this supplement is inversely associated with levels of homocysteine, which is an important risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

In a clinical trial conducted at the ISR (University of Pretoria) in 2009 researchers studied the effect of Cellfood® Longevity in reducing homocysteine levels. Some of the findings were:

  • A statistically significant increase in serum folate (demonstrating superior bioavailability of the supplement)
  • Statistically significant reduction in homocysteine (15%) 
  • No change in urate levels (not going to induce gout)
  • Reducing homocysteine will not only benefit stroke victims, but also other patients suffering from other chronic conditions.

Conclusion

The world of the new millennium is the world of the individual - people expect to get more out of life and improve their quality of life.

  • Most conditions being treated by medicines are preventable - chronic degenerative diseases like heart disease and stroke, are clearly linked to the diet and lifestyle
  • People who survived a stroke could benefit from using Cellfood® and the Cellfood® family. These supplements could also assist in preventing stroke in the first place.

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